Funding war of the war on cancer

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There has been quite a lot of attention to the Breast Cancer. While I personally think that every cancer and cancer victims should get the same amount of awareness, it seems that there are some results. Many articles, news, studies, such as this one.

"We need to make sure our elected officials see the cancer threat in it's true perspective. For example, translating cancer deaths into terms deemed more newsworthy by the media, cancer deaths amount to three jumbo jets crashing each day! One bill in Congress is for $109 billion for Iraq and Katrina; that contrasts to $5.08 billion that cancer research and advocacy groups are convinced is a modest amount for the NIH's National Cancer Institute, the main engine for funding US cancer research"

Elections are just weeks away and prostate cancer survivor Jim Waldenfels is asking that cancer survivors, family, friends, and all concerned about the future of cancer research, let politicians know that we support restoration of funding for cancer research -- and we want to know in decisive measure where they stand before we go out to vote.

"If we do not succeed, NCI cancer research funding will be cut again," states Waldenfels. In his article, Common Sense from Cancer Survivors, he presents a breakdown of the funding cuts that have already taken place in the last several years, and the continued decrease in cancer research funding we will be faced with if we do not have politicians in office who support cancer research funding comparative to other urgent national priorities such as the war on terrorism.

"We need to make sure our elected officials see the cancer threat in it's true perspective. For example, translating cancer deaths into terms deemed more newsworthy by the media, cancer deaths amount to three jumbo jets crashing each day! One bill in Congress is for $109 billion for Iraq and Katrina; that contrasts to $5.08 billion that cancer research and advocacy groups are convinced is a modest amount for the NIH's National Cancer Institute, the main engine for funding US cancer research," states Waldenfels.

In addition, Waldenfels provides a list of who in office has and has not signed the Congressional Cancer Promise, which senators and representatives need to hear from us about what is important to us, as well as a list of candidate campaign web sites, and leads to the key House and Senate appropriations subcommittees.

Common Sense from Cancer Survivors is an exceptionally well-written and thoughtfully researched article -- and for everyone interested in protecting federal funding for cancer research, Waldenfels has put together a comprehensive list of contacts as a practical step to begin to make that happen. It's a funding war of the War on Cancer and Waldenfels has presented a potentially strategic means to winning it.

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